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FAQ

General Information

Our goal at Muskogee County EMS is to provide a fast response time on all emergency calls. The first thing the Emergency Medical Dispatcher (EMD) will need to know is the phone number you are calling from.  This is in case you are disconnected they can call you back.  Then they will want to know the location of the emergency so they can start an ambulance that way.  By asking these and other pertinent questions, the EMD can provide the responding paramedics with critical information to help them prepare for proper patient care.   The information you provide to the EMD helps them determine the best and most appropriate ambulance and other resourses to send to your emergency.

In addition, advancements in Emergency Medical Dispatch science have now made it safe and effective to respond to a certain number of low acuity 911 calls without red lights and sirens, or ‘cold response’.   This creates the safest possible environment for the public.   Modern medical dispatchers now have powerful tools and advanced training to better identify how serious the emergency is and are better equipped to instruct the caller on ways to help the patient prior to the arrival of the ambulance.

All of this hinges on good and complete information from the caller so bear with them, they really are in a position to help you.  As the reporting party, you can play a crucial role in the outcome of the emergency so please stay on the line with that EMD and help them gather that critical information.

The Star of Life was originally designed by the U.S. National Highway Traffic Safety Administration.

The serpent and staff in the symbol portray the staff of Asclepius, an ancient Greek physician deified as the god of medicine. The staff represents medicine and healing, with the skin-shedding serpent being indicative of renewal. Each of the star’s arms has meaning as well. Detection, reporting, response, on scene care, care in transport and transfer to definitive care are integral parts of the whole.

The Star of Life is a universal symbol of emergency medical care. We place it on our ambulances, uniforms, trauma bags, and sometimes our personal vehicles.  It can also be found on road maps and highway signs indicating the location of or access to qualified emergency medical care.

Rod of asclepius

star of Life

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Because of the need to respond to emergencies in a rapid and efficient manner, we will quickly dispatch an ambulance. On occasion though, the person calling for the ambulance may change his or her mind, and cancel the ambulance. When the call is cancelled, the EMT’s on the ambulance will immediately turn off the lights and siren.

The need for safety and patient care is a major concern for us. The limited space in the back of our ambulance, as well as the number of seatbelts, only allow for the patient and the EMT in most situations. Usually the family member will be asked to ride in the front cab of the ambulance, with the seat belt in place.

Because of advances in pre-hospital care, some patients may benefit from additional time taken at the scene to stabilize before transport. An example may be someone having a heart attack, breathing problems, etc. Muskogee County EMS medics are in contact with the emergency room staff, and may perform many procedures and administer medications as needed, before arrival at the hospital.

No. The Paramedic level is at the top of the pre-hospital pyramid in Oklahoma. There are four levels recognized by the Oklahoma State Department of Health – Emergency Systems Division in Oklahoma. The First level is the Emergency Medical Responder (EMR), followed by the Emergency Medical Technician (EMT), next is the Advanced / Intermediate EMT (AEMT), and then the Paramedic is the highest trained level.

A long time ago medics were refered to as a Basic Paramedic, Intermediate Paramedic or Paramedic, depending on the level of training you had. Now that has been shortened to EMR, EMT, AEMT, with Paramedic the highest level. 

Emergency Medical Technician

Pre-hospital medicine has come a long way since the 1970’s and 80’s. Paramedics can now stabilize more patients in the field, including administering medications, assisting a patient to breathe, starting an IV, and transmitting an EKG to the emergency room doctor, all before the ambulance even leaves your driveway!

Muskogee County is one of the largest counties in Oklahoma. Because of this, when one of our satellite-stationed ambulances (e.g. in Fort Gibson, Warner, Haskell or Webbers Falls) respond to a call, we frequently rotate another ambulance to that part of the county. This helps us to more rapidly respond if a second emergency call comes in from that community.

Advancements in the science of pre-hospital assessment and care have made it seldom necessary to rush to the hospital in the vast majority of cases.   This is generally reserved for only the most time-sensitive and life-threatening conditions that cannot be stabilized “in the field”.  Muskogee County EMS medics are in contact with the emergency room doctors, and may perform many procedures, and administer medications as needed, before arrival at the hospital.


In addition, many studies now show that the increased risk of the ambulance being involved in a motor vehicle accident means that running with red lights and sirens often creates more risk to the patient and the public than is gained in the very small amount of time saved.

In addition, advancements in Emergency Medical Dispatch science have now made it safe and effective to respond to a certain number of low acuity 911 calls without red lights and sirens, or ‘cold response’.    Medical dispatchers also now have powerful tools and training to better identify how serious the emergency is and are better equipped to instruct the caller on ways to help the patient prior to the arrival of the ambulance.

To apply for reciprocity in Oklahoma, contact the Oklahoma State Department of Health – Emergency Systems Division, at (405) 271-4027 or check the website at www.ok.gov/health/Protective_Health/Emergency_Medical_Services/

Click on the link provided and it will take you to the Oklahoma State Department of Health – Emergency Systems Division’s web site for more information on renewal. www.ok.gov/health/Protective_Health/Emergency_Medical_Services/

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